love as revolutionary praxis.

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We don’t learn to love each other well in the easy moments. Anyone is good company at a cocktail party. But love is born when we misunderstand one another and make it right, when we cry in the kitchen, when we show up uninvited with magazines and granola bars, in an effort to say, I love you.

Shauna Niequist, Bread & Wine: A Love Letter to Life Around the Table, with Recipes (via natashakills)

(via natashakills)

I think it’s really important that we get rid of the idea that protest will create change. The idea of protest organizing, as summarized by [community organizer] Saul Alinsky, is that if we put enough pressure on the government, it will do things to help people. We don’t realize that that kind of organizing worked only when the government was very strong, when the West ruled the world, relatively speaking. But with globalization and the weakening of the nation-state, that kind of organizing doesn’t work. We need to do what I call visionary organizing. Recognize that in every crisis, people do not respond like a school of fish. Some people become immobilized. Some people become very angry, some commit suicide, and other people begin to find solutions. And visionary organizers look at those people, recognize them and encourage them, and they become leaders of the future.

Grace Lee Boggs (via jacobwren)

(via jacobwren)

afrolez:

This photograph of Sister #GraceLeeBoggs and I was taken in April 2010 at Uncle Vincent Harding’s home in Denver, CO when we gathered to learn from and share with Sister Grace.
Sister Grace is in hospice care. Please keep her in the places that are sacred in your life. She is a living legend, a true American Revolutionary, who, at 99 years of age, has consistently walked the talk of peace, justice, freedom, dignity, hardcore grassroots organizing and intergenerational work for decades.
If you haven’t seen the PBS Documentary, “American Revolutionary: The Evolution of Grace Lee Boggs, please make it your business to see it: http://americanrevolutionaryfilm.com
Cards and other thoughts are accepted at the Boggs Center, 3061 Field St, Detroit, MI 48214

afrolez:

This photograph of Sister #GraceLeeBoggs and I was taken in April 2010 at Uncle Vincent Harding’s home in Denver, CO when we gathered to learn from and share with Sister Grace.

Sister Grace is in hospice care. Please keep her in the places that are sacred in your life. She is a living legend, a true American Revolutionary, who, at 99 years of age, has consistently walked the talk of peace, justice, freedom, dignity, hardcore grassroots organizing and intergenerational work for decades.

If you haven’t seen the PBS Documentary, “American Revolutionary: The Evolution of Grace Lee Boggs, please make it your business to see it: http://americanrevolutionaryfilm.com

Cards and other thoughts are accepted at the Boggs Center, 3061 Field St, Detroit, MI 48214

you are loved.

Frustrated because as a womxn of color, my work in equity is often seen as self serving. The irony is that on campus, people of color are often cornered into diversity work, e.g: serving as a representative for students of color on a committee, task force, etc. Yes, this work validates my identities in ways that my “general education” experiences did not (because they cater towards the majority— which are not people who look like me), but more importantly, I do this work because I remember how comforting it was for me as a student to see someone putting their energy towards ensuring that my history and experiences no longer remained invisible. So to those who are experiencing the same struggle, remember this: you belong here, you matter, and you are loved.

The world is not a kind place. You will feel a lot of pain. Make sure you are with someone who makes it all bearable.

You’ve got too much soul to be handled by someone who has never been passionate.

thelovewhisperer:

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A Father’s Recipe For The Right Guy

One secret to a happy life: finding the right guy you should date or even marry and this is no easy task. Here is a good advice from a father for his daughter in finding the right guy. This is sweet and touching at the same time.

18mr:

Fast food workers struggling for a wage of $15 an hour and the right to unionize participated in a nonviolent civil disobedience action last week. 

This is Emily Nguyen (ponytail) and Kalia Vang (visor). Emily is 20 years-old and a sophomore at Sacramento City College. She’s worked in fast food for a year and a half and makes California minimum wage ($9 an hour). She says, “I’m just working to breathe, to stay alive. I’m not really living life. We won’t stop till we meet our destination, till our wages go up.”

 Watch the emotional video of their arrest here, and be sure to support them on Facebook here!

(via thisiswhiteprivilege)

staff:

Today’s the day. The day you help save the internet from being ruined.

Ready? 

Yes, you are, and we’re ready to help you.

(Long story short: The FCC is about to make a critical decision as to whether or not internet service providers have to treat all traffic equally. If they choose wrong, then the internet where anyone can start a website for any reason at all, the internet that’s been so momentous, funny, weird, and surprising—that internet could cease to exist. Here’s your chance to preserve a beautiful thing.)